Can The Wall Write a Story?!

Hi wall!! I’m almost done with the hunger games trilogy and it was probably my favorite trilogy I have ever read! Anyway, I was wondering since I am almost done, if you could write me a story that I could read. Also if you have any book recommendations please let me know! I am into fantasy and I like to get caught in a good book! 🙂

Not many stories fit on a post-it. Here’s one of the most famous shortest stories of all time, supposedly written by Hemingway: For sale: baby shoes, never worn. | For finding books similar to one you’ve just read, I highly recommend LibraryThing, a community of dedicated readers who share their book lists. Here’s the entry on The Hunger Games: https://www.librarything.com/work/4979986

Book recommendations?

Book recommendations?
Book recommendations?

I’m not sure what your genre preferences are, but one of my helpers says Slay by Brittany Morris in our POP! collection is a good one. It’s about a young black game developer who creates a hugely popular VR game. I recommend a visit to librarything.com, where you can type in a title or author you like and see related recommendations, based on thousands of participant’s personal collections.

Got any books on forestry or tree farming?

Got any books on forestry or tree farming?
Got any books on forestry or tree farming?

We do have some and are collecting more titles in ag due to the growth of the Environmental Studies Program. I recommend searching our catalog (library.bc.edu). You can also browse the stacks in the SD section (3rd floor O’Neill, way over to the right), but many of the more current items are online. Connect with the Environmental Studies Librarian, Enid Karr (karre@bc.edu) for more ideas, like getting items from other libraries.

Where is the oldest book on campus? The smallest?

Where is the oldest book on campus? The smallest?
Where is the oldest book on campus? The smallest?

Some of this depends on your definition of “book”. The oldest printed book is in Burns Library. It is Jean Gerson’s De Spiritualib[us] Nupciis (On Spiritual Marriage) from about 1470. Lots more info about it, and a link to the digital version, here: bit.ly/ReallyOldBook. We also have a manuscript (handwritten book) from ~1300: http://burnsantiphoner.bc.edu. That is essentially an old church song book. I’m not sure about smallest. Do you mean height/width or thickness? Or smallest total volume? Either way, I might not be able to find a good answer.

Can BC Libraries please acquire “Flights” by Olga Tokarczuk?

Can BC Libraries please acquire "Flights" by Olga Tokarczuk? She's probably one of the most important contemp Polish authors and this book won the Man Booker prize...
Can BC Libraries please acquire “Flights” by Olga Tokarczuk? She’s probably one of the most important contemp Polish authors and this book won the Man Booker prize…

Thanks very much for the suggestion. Sounds like something we should acquire! I have forwarded it to our librarian for Slavic and Eastern Languages and Literatures, Nina Bogdanovsky, who immediately ordered it.

What are some good mystery novels that O’Neill has?

What are some good mystery novels that O'Neill has?
What are some good mystery novels that O’Neill has?

We’re a little better situated for classics like Raymond Chandler (The Big Sleep), Agatha Christie (Murder on the Orient Express), and Sherlock Holmes. If you’re looking for the latest stuff you can try our Pop collection in the lobby. Another approach would be to take a book like this Crime Fiction Handbook and see which of their recommendations sounds good to you–we pretty much have everything on the list. bit.ly/bc-cfh. I found it, and a lot of mystery titles, by doing this search on the library homepage: bit.ly/bc-detective. But you’re asking me, so I’ll say: read The Big Sleep.

What’s the oldest book not still returned in O’Neill or BC in general?

What's the oldest book not still returned in O'Neill or BC in general?
What’s the oldest book not still returned in O’Neill or BC in general?

I’m not sure what you mean: the oldest book currently checked out?

If you mean oldest publication date, my library assistants attempted to glean this information by wrestling with the information system, and it turns out to be a much more complicated process than anticipated. IOW: we don’t know. If you mean longest checked out, theoretically, that would be 4 years because faculty and staff can check items out for a year and renew 3 times. If a book hasn’t been returned after its last possible due date, it’s marked “missing,” after a month and is no longer checked out, so the checked-out clock stops. IOW, again, we don’t know. My assistants might not always have all the answers, but at least they’re honest about it!

Is there another area for popular books other than this floor and the first floor? I’m having a hard time finding books to read for fun.

Is there another area for popular books other than this floor and the first floor? I'm having a hard time finding books to read for fun.
Is there another area for popular books other than this floor and the first floor? I’m having a hard time finding books to read for fun.


You can recommend titles Pop.Reading@bc.edu or request books by Interlibrary Loan bit.ly/ILLatBC. We have books that might be considered enjoyable/recreational reading throughout the collection. Literature is on Level 4 in the P call numbers. Non fiction is everywhere – ask at the Reference Desk for suggestions in areas that interest you. And don’t forget we have popular eBooks and audiobooks through Overdrive (bc.overdrive.com). Happy reading!

Could/would the Library host a poetry “read-in” in memory of the late great Mary Oliver?

Could/would the Library host a poetry "read-in" in memory of the late great Mary Oliver?
Could/would the Library host a poetry “read-in” in memory of the late great Mary Oliver?

I’ll have my colleagues ask around and get back to you.

The library would certainly consider providing space for such an event were someone to organize it; perhaps you could reach out to faculty in the English Dept. affiliated with the Creating Writing Seminar (bit.ly/bc-cw-seminar) or Creative Writing Concentration (bit.ly/bc-cw-concentration), or perhaps students who publish a student literary magazine such as Stylus, Epicenters or Elements. If you would like to schedule an event in library space, contact the administrative office at 617-552-4470.

Would it be possible to get a few copies of the Irish Times in the newspaper rotation?

Would it be possible to get a few copies of the Irish Times in the newspaper rotation? Many thanks
Would it be possible to get a few copies of the Irish Times in the newspaper rotation? Many thanks

I can’t say whether it would be possible, but I will forward your request for the print version to our librarian for Irish Studies. The content is available through the database Nexis Uni (bit.ly/BCNexisUni); current, though not in a great format, or in microfilm on Level One (with a several month delay.)

How many books are there in BC Library? What is the oldest one?

How many books are there in BC Library? What is the oldest one?
How many books are there in BC Library? What is the oldest one?

According to the latest Factbook, at the end of fiscal year 2017, there were 2,326,205 books available from O’Neill Library. Defining what a “book” is gets kind of tricky (librarians love to nerd out on this stuff), but the oldest printed book in our collection is Jean Gerson’s De Spiritualib[us] Nupciis (On Spiritual Marriage). It has been digitized and is available to read online: bit.ly/BurnsOldestBook. The oldest item we have is a Mesopotamian clay tablet from 2000-3000 BC.

For the books that are too tall for the shelves, why are they shelved sideways with the spines facing down instead of up?

For the books that are too tall for the shelves, why are they shelved sideways with the spines facing down instead of up? Wouldn't it make more sense for the spines to face up so people can read the call #'s without pulling the book out? If I am missing something please let me know.
For the books that are too tall for the shelves, why are they shelved sideways with the spines facing down instead of up? Wouldn’t it make more sense for the spines to face up so people can read the call #’s without pulling the book out? If I am missing something please let me know.

This is done for preservation purposes. Book covers tend to be slightly larger than book pages. Therefore, shelving these books with their spines facing up would damage the binding. We are currently conducting a library-wide collection maintenance project that includes the expansion of the oversize section to accommodate items that are currently shelved sideways.